K-Tec

Astronomy in Schools - Regarding the Venus Transit June 8th.

  • Seanie_Morris
  • Topic Author
  • Offline
  • Administrator
  • Administrator
More
19 years 10 months ago #2554 by Seanie_Morris
Hello everyone,

This thread is on a tangent with the other thread with similar theme and name.

Are there any Teachers reading this who could add/criticise to the following 'idea'?

Teaching Kids on June 8th:

I hit upon a simple, and probably effective way of reaching out to young kids out there. But, it will have to be aimed at primary schools, because all the secondary schools will be closed for the Leaving/Junior Cert exams.

Consider this:
What if volunteer members from clubs and societies were to contact their local primary schools, for 'an educational time in the school yard'?

One, maybe two of you, go to the school on the morning of June 8th, prepared with mylar sunglasses, and welders glasses, with a pair of binoculars readied for solar projection. And maybe perhaps a projector and laptop (if you have access to them) for an indoor presentation as either an extra, or in case the day is a washout. Its free, takes only a few hours of your time during the morning, and will hit the intended target audience with much eagerness that you are bound to have a positive feedback.

Give the kids information sheets or 'packs', and give out a few mylar sunglasses for their parents to try out with them at home.

I am currently writing up a 'programme' and info sheet to send out to principles of local schools. Any takers when I'm finished? I'll post it up for viewing when I'm finished anyway, into the Files section.

Feedback please!

Seanie.

Midlands Astronomy Club.
Radio Presenter (Midlands 103), Space Enthusiast, Astronomy Outreach Co-ordinator.
Former IFAS Chairperson and Secretary.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
19 years 10 months ago #2557 by gnason
I would advocate extreme caution in showing school children the Sun through home made mylar glasses and under no circumstances should anyone use welder's glass in these circumstances unless he/she has public liability insurance, a good solicitor and enjoys litigation!

Anyway, I doubt any school principal will allow children in their care to view the Sun through any filter, even proprietary ones with a CE mark, and certainly not without written parental permission. I would suggest projection only for schoolgrounds. I have a mounted Light Line Solar Projector made by a UK company (now out of business) for the 1999 solar eclipse, which produces a fairly good solar disk.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Seanie_Morris
  • Topic Author
  • Offline
  • Administrator
  • Administrator
More
19 years 10 months ago #2559 by Seanie_Morris
True Gordon, I did kind of think of that too, about litigation and all that!

But, in a way, thats why I said to do it for free and ask to be invited, because then you couldn't be held accountable for it. If you were actually presenting it, and inviting them to you, THEN thats where public liability insurance would have to be a must. Thats the kind of circumstance that prohibits clubs which do not have insurance from hosting something like side-walk astronomy etc.

I've been led to beliveve that proper 3D-looking mylar sunglasses were 100% safe to look at the sun, as its highly recommended to use them for eclipses when you can look at the sun continuously for tens of minutes almost straight through.

But you're right Girdon,. prevention is better, and projection is, of course, the proper way to go. Both in terms of safety and educational aspects of naked eye exposure.

Seanie.

Midlands Astronomy Club.
Radio Presenter (Midlands 103), Space Enthusiast, Astronomy Outreach Co-ordinator.
Former IFAS Chairperson and Secretary.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
19 years 10 months ago #2561 by albertw
Hi,

I would advocate extreme caution in showing school children the Sun through home made mylar glasses and under no circumstances should anyone use welder's glass in these circumstances unless he/she has public liability insurance, a good solicitor and enjoys litigation!


The ESO folks here are advising that the only method that should be used in schools is projection. Even a slightest hole in eclipse shades could have disasterous consequences.

The solarscopes that they are advocating (url on another thread) are really good for this. Its practically impossible for a kid to get their eye in any danger with it, which is still a problem wih projection through a scope.

Cheers,
~Al

Albert White MSc FRAS
Chairperson, International Dark Sky Association - Irish Section
www.darksky.ie/

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
19 years 10 months ago #2568 by gnason

True Gordon, I did kind of think of that too, about litigation and all that! But, in a way, thats why I said to do it for free and ask to be invited, because then you couldn't be held accountable for it. If you were actually presenting it, and inviting them to you, THEN thats where public liability insurance would have to be a must. Thats the kind of circumstance that prohibits clubs which do not have insurance from hosting something like side-walk astronomy etc.Seanie.


The fact that you are offering your services free unfortunately does not make you any less accountable in law than if you charged a fee. Many services and places are free (museums, parks, concerts, fire works displays etc) but if the organisers or owners are negligent, injured parties can and will sue.

If a child's eyes are damaged, or even if they are not but parents believe they may have been, then the child via his/her parents will take an action. We live in an extremely litigious society. Remember too that claims can be made up to the time they are statute barred so even later eye problems that are perceived to have been caused by you showing the child the Sun through a solar filter could involve you in expensive legal expenses.

It’s a nice idea, showing children the transit of Venus across the face of the Sun, but play safe and buy a solar light projection box. I doubt you would be let in through the school gates with any other form of solar viewer.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Time to create page: 0.121 seconds
Powered by Kunena Forum