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lookalike galaxies support string theory

  • albertw
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news.independent.co.uk/world/science_tec...ory.jsp?story=615886


Strung up
The recent discovery of two lookalike galaxies has led physicists one step closer to finding the ultimate theory of everything, says Marcus Chown

02 March 2005

Could two lookalike galaxies, barely a whisker apart in the night sky, herald a revolution in our understanding of fundamental physics? Some physicists believe that the two galaxies are the same - its image has been split into two, they maintain, by a "cosmic string"; a San Andreas Fault in the very fabric of space and time.

If this interpretation is correct, then CSL-1 - the name of the curious double galaxy - is the first concrete evidence for "superstring theory": the best candidate for a "theory of everything", which attempts to encapsulate all the phenomena of nature in one neat set of equations.
Albert White MSc FRAS
Chairperson, International Dark Sky Association - Irish Section
www.darksky.ie/
17 years 11 months ago #9797

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Replied by Son Goku on topic Re: lookalike galaxies support string theory

A lot of that is a little bit "iffy" isn't it.

There are a few other explanations for something like that and they haven't proved that string theory scales up to the macroscopic.
Insert phrase said by somebody else.
17 years 11 months ago #9815

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Replied by slanders on topic Re: lookalike galaxies support string theory

news.independent.co.uk/world/science_tec...ory.jsp?story=615886
02 March 2005

Could two lookalike galaxies, barely a whisker apart in the night sky, herald a revolution in our understanding of fundamental physics? Some physicists believe that the two galaxies are the same - its image has been split into two, they maintain, by a "cosmic string"; a San Andreas Fault in the very fabric of space and time.

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Trawling through some older messages on cosmology, I happened across this one. It's an area where theories come and go, where speculation (hopefully scientifically based!) is rife. Is there an easy way to track recent thinking on articles such as that quoted? Or is it just a matter of religiously scouring the scientific press for the latest theories? Just what *is* the latest accepted theory on superstrings?

15 years 7 months ago #47656

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Replied by albertw on topic Re: lookalike galaxies support string theory

Trawling through some older messages on cosmology, I happened across this one. It's an area where theories come and go, where speculation (hopefully scientifically based!) is rife. Is there an easy way to track recent thinking on articles such as that quoted? Or is it just a matter of religiously scouring the scientific press for the latest theories? Just what *is* the latest accepted theory on superstrings?


It does seem very much 'theory of the week' environment at times!

The best way I've found to keep up to date with things is to subscribe to a magazine or listen to podcasts. Sky&Telescope will get around to mentioning things like this but it can take a while and only gets a small mention. Something like Nature will give you more detail, but its not just about astronomy. Personally I listen to the Nature and New Scientist podcast (free from their websites) regularly to try to keep up with what current thinking and discoveries are.

If you want to take things a bit more seriously you might want to join the Royal Astronomical Society. Their regular magazine Astronomy & Geophysics covers topics in some depth and the Monthly Notices (which cost more in print but are available online to members) is the main journal.

For more detail you can search in www.arxiv.org/find . This site stores journal articles that have been submitted to professional journals, though they are the versions that were submitted not necessarily the versions that were accepted (ApJ etc. want you to pay for those usually). A search for CSL-1 finds 7 documents so if you are prepared to read through the detailed subject matter and the mathematics you can! Searching for the word 'review' in the title field can also

The Abstract Data Search is also useful as it points to the actual journal versions (some of which may be free to download) adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html . This is most useful if you have free access to all the journals through a college, otherwise it can just be frustrating!

Those two 'search engines' are more for research work though. You can spend a lot of time hunting down the best articles and sorting the wheat from the chaff. Not really ideal for just finding out the latest thinking.
Albert White MSc FRAS
Chairperson, International Dark Sky Association - Irish Section
www.darksky.ie/
15 years 7 months ago #47661

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Replied by slanders on topic Re: lookalike galaxies support string theory

Albertw wrote:
It does seem very much 'theory of the week' environment at times!

The best way I've found to keep up to date with things is to subscribe to a magazine or listen to podcasts. Sky&Telescope will get around to mentioning things like this but it can take a while and only gets a small mention. Something like Nature will give you more detail, but its not just about astronomy. Personally I listen to the Nature and New Scientist podcast (free from their websites) regularly to try to keep up with what current thinking and discoveries are.


Thanks for the useful urls. I've been an amateur astronomer for years, but a little out of touch right now and wanted to get up to speed again with developments. Online resources are by definition more current and a very good starting point.

Susan.
15 years 7 months ago #47691

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