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oldest known planet found in milky way

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oldest known planet found in milky way was created by stepryan

ladies and gents,
a link to an interesting story. Oh no the cosmologists have to revise their theories !!!! fancy that ;).
Stephen.


hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/2003/19/
19 years 6 months ago #189

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Replied by albertw on topic Re: oldest known planet found in milky way

Oh no the cosmologists have to revise their theories !!!! fancy that ;)


They never revise their theories, they come up with new data to make the theory fit! Need more mass, hmmm... lets dream up dark matter, the satronomers cant find it cause its dark so then they will leave our theories alone :-)

Cheers,
~Al
Albert White MSc FRAS
Chairperson, International Dark Sky Association - Irish Section
www.darksky.ie/
19 years 6 months ago #191

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Replied by spculleton on topic Re: oldest known planet found in milky way

That's the planet they found in M4 isn't it? That's a story that nearly made me choke on my cornflakes. Imagine living on a planet IN a globular cluster.
I was reading about M13 in Burnhams' today and he happened to describe what night-time for people on a planet in a globular cluster would be;
"The appearance of the heavens from a point within the Hercules Cluster would be a spectacle of incomparable splendour; the heavens would be filled with uncountable numbers of blazing stars which would dwarf our oen Sirius and Canopus to insignificance. Many thousands of stars ranging in brilliance between Venus and the full Moon would be continually visible, so that there would be no real night at all on a planet in a globular cluster. Inhabitants of such a planet would probably know nothing of other clusters, of the Galaxy, of other galaxies, as their view would be completely blocked by the brilliance of their own skies. To them, the Hercules Cluster would be 'the Universe'"
Burnham's Celestial Handbook, volume 2, page 987.
That kind of rocks, doesn't it?
Shane Culleton.

Dozo Yoroshiku Onegai Shimasu
19 years 6 months ago #252

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