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Daytime Viewing?

  • Graham
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Daytime Viewing? was created by Graham

Hi All,

Can you see Jupiter and Saturn during 'sun up' hours?

I know light drowns them out, but do they actually disappear 100% or is there still something there?

Graham.
13 years 4 months ago #80876

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Replied by Frank Ryan on topic Re:Daytime Viewing?

The brighter objects yes.
Saturn right now, no, coz it's close to the sun
Obviously NEVER go anywhere NEAR the Sun with
A scope or binos when its up. One mistake and you are BLIND.
Aside from the warning.
Ive observed Venus, Saturn & Jupiter in sun up times
Along with varipus bright stars and the Iss.
Mskes for a different view alright.
Check stellarium to give ypu an idea of whats to see
My Astrophotography
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13 years 4 months ago #80882

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Replied by dave_lillis on topic Re:Daytime Viewing?

Graham wrote:

Can you see Jupiter and Saturn during 'sun up' hours?

Yes, with extreme care and only if you know exactly what your doing.
Always err on the side of caution.
Dave L. on facebook , See my images in flickr
Chairman. Shannonside Astronomy Club (Limerick)

Carrying around my 20" obsession is going to kill me,
but what a way to go. :)
+ 12"LX200, MK67, Meade2045, 4"refractor
13 years 4 months ago #80903

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Replied by Seanie_Morris on topic Re:Daytime Viewing?

One of your best options Graham is by using a GoTo-mounted telescope. The benefit of using those is obvious - you just need to select your (bright) daytime target, and press 'GoTo'!

Like the others said, do your best to NOT look for anything close to the Sun. What would you call close, you ask? Try 4 to 5 lengths of your closed fist held out at arms length. This simulates roughly 5 arc degrees of distance per fist, so thats 20 to 25 degrees away from the Sun - I would call this your minimum safe distance.

An extra tip for you, should you try looking for anything with your telescope. Position yourself in a shadow of e.g. a building. This will reduce overall glare, even if it's just an illusion in reality (like the way you shield your eyes with your hand when looking in the direction of the Sun at something far away).

If you don't have a GoTo mount, then you will need tojudge where to point and scan through the area. Do so at low power, but slowly. Depending on how bright the object you're looking for, you can miss it in a bright sky. Patience will win it for you in the end.

Hope this helps,

Seanie.
Midlands Astronomy Club.
Radio Presenter (Midlands 103), Space Enthusiast, Astronomy Outreach Co-ordinator.
Former IFAS Chairperson and Secretary.
13 years 4 months ago #80907

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  • michaeloconnell
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Replied by michaeloconnell on topic Re:Daytime Viewing?

Yea, as Seanie said, a GOTO telescope is a must really.
I've seen Mercury, Venus, Jupiter & Saturn with a scope during the daytime.
Equatorial could bands can be seen on Jupiter.
Interesting experiement.

Michael.
13 years 4 months ago #80915

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Replied by Seanie_Morris on topic Re:Daytime Viewing?

Another tip for you Graham. In case you don't know, all the planets, Moon, and Sun travel along an invisible line called the ecliptic. During daytime currently, the Moon is a daytime object. If you draw a line connecting the Moon and the Sun, you have the ecliptic! Continue it in either direction, and somewhere along this 'line' will be the planets. This is a great way of narrowing down the location of what you want to see. Using something like Stellarium (free software) to find your target, you now have a technique to find it in the sky during daytime.

Hope this also helps,

Seanie.
Midlands Astronomy Club.
Radio Presenter (Midlands 103), Space Enthusiast, Astronomy Outreach Co-ordinator.
Former IFAS Chairperson and Secretary.
13 years 4 months ago #80946

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Replied by eansbro on topic Re:Daytime Viewing?

You can also image stars and bright nebulae during the daytime. I tried this experiment awhile back.

The biggest factor is magnification or f/#. By using a Barlow to increase the focal length, the sky background is reduced significantly while the star is reduced not at all. I had a difficult time when imaging M57 in the daytime. The key to resolving this is the F ratio. A short F/ratio single frame background had a lot more "daytime" light or white daytime light.

This was the only way to get anything on the ccd sensor to capture a signal. F/10 worked well with a result with a darker background. The rest is lots of high dynamic range of the camera and gain. Focus was important.

Eamonn A
J62
www.kingslandobservatory.com
13 years 4 months ago #80955

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Replied by BrianOCarroll on topic Re:Daytime Viewing?

I have a question on a similar theme. Anybody care to guess if this LCROSS Lunar impact tomorrow afternoon at 12:30 will be visible in an 11" scope here (i.e. in daylight)? Will any of you be out there trying to observe/image it?

According to APOD , it could be visible in a 10"+ scope in North America & Pacific regions. My guess is we won't see anything from here because the dust cloud that gets kicked up will be washed out by daylight.

Edit / Stellarium says the Moon will only be at 12 degrees above the horizon by that time. Not ideal!
Last edit: 13 years 3 months ago by BrianOCarroll.
13 years 3 months ago #81579

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  • DeirdreKelleghan
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Replied by DeirdreKelleghan on topic Re:Daytime Viewing?



Toward Cabeus with a pencil ,a rough sketch from last night . 150X Seeing 3 ,between clouds 21:30 UT - 22:40 UT Conditions were crap.

Here is my very rough sketch from last night, as you can see Newton , Newton G and Newton A appear very shallow and ill defined, Cabeus is even less so . Mine is an 8 inch dob, 8mm eyepiece ,150 X, I would not expect to see any impact plumb at all at that magnification,even if I was able to turn off the sun for a while.

To observe it best you really need a dark sky and about 500X, so daytime impact viewing may best be seen on NASA TV. However if its clear I will look anyway and maybe try a daytime sketch of the area just out of interest. It may be an historic impact, H2O in the plume could change the face and pace of lunar exploration forever.

Just out of interest here is a great guide to observing the impact, if you are in the right timezone.
www.msnbc.msn.com/id/33196816/

And here is another one

science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2009/05oct_lcrossvg.htm


Deirdre Kelleghan
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Outreach IFAS
www.irishastronomy.org/
www.deirdrekelleghan.com/
twitter.com/skysketcher
13 years 3 months ago #81581

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Replied by BrianOCarroll on topic Re:Daytime Viewing?

Cool! Thanks. Plenty of information on those sites. It appears NASA TV is the best place to observe for us alright. Can't wait to see some of the pictures from around (and above) the Earth, not to mention the results of the spectral analysis!
13 years 3 months ago #81582

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