Observations - 6/01/2020

4 months 3 weeks ago - 4 months 2 weeks ago #108147 by flt158
Observations - 6/01/2020 was created by flt158
Goodness me, folks! We have only had 6 days so far in 2020, but I have managed to have 3 reasonably good observing nighttime sessions with my William Optics 158 mm apochromatic refractor which is supported by a Berlebach Planet altazimuth mount. I also use a 70 mm F/6 small apochromatic refractor which I have as my finder scope. Mirror diagonals are both fitted on both scopes. That means my north & and south are not inverted; but my east & west are.

All my figures can be checked on www.stelledoppie.it

Each of these celestial objects are near Alpha Cassiopeiae (Schedar) and Delta Cassiopeiae (Ruchbah).

1. Schedar (Alpha Cassiopeiae) often is my first port of call. It is an optical binary otherwise called H 5 18. The primary is a bright yellow star. The magnitudes are 2.4 and 9. The separation (sep) is 70.4". The position angle (PA) is 283 degrees. It is a delightful sight at 40X.

2. Achird (Eta Cassiopeiae) is next of course as it is nearby. Its magnitudes are 3.5 and 7.4. Sep = 13.4". PA = 326 degrees. It is a glorious sight at 40X. The colours are yellow and almond brown. That secondary is a K7 spectral class star. Those colours are accentuated at higher magnifications.

3. ES 2 is a faint but true binary discovered by the Reverend Thomas Espin. The magnitudes are 9 and 9.5. Sep = 5.9". PA = 113 degrees. It is my first time to see it. My scope split it well at 112X.

4. Sti 1364 is an optical double discovered by a Roman Catholic priest called Johann Stein. It is seriously faint with magnitudes 9.8 and 11. Sep = 14.7". PA = 9 degrees. I observed the split at 40X and 112X.

5. STT 33 is a very fine optical triple star near Delta Cassiopeiae (Ruchbah). The magnitudes are 7.3, 9 and 10.3. Sep's = 26.9" & 107". PA's = 77 and 109 degrees. The colours are blue (B9), almond brown (K7) and white. It looked truly charming at 40X and 112X. That B companion is my 2nd K7 star of the night.

6. ES 1712 is an optical double star. The magnitudes are 7.9 and 9.3. Sep = 47.2". PA = 2 degrees. I had a successful split at 40X. But 112X did it justice too.

7. HL 1088 is a true binary. But the C star is optical. The primary is blue, but the other 2 are white. Sep's = 19.5" and 107.2". PA's = 168 and 218 degrees. Very nice and wide at 40X. They resemble a wide "V".

8. WW Cassiopeiae is my 6th observed carbon star in the great "W". And it is another real attraction for carbon star aficionados. I describe it as a quite rich orange carbon star. And I have issued a magnitude of +9.7 on www.aavso.org
It hasn't been estimated for about 6 months on that website. It varies between 9.1 and 11.7. There is a 9.8 magnitude star right next to it. There is plenty of dark space around the 2 stars. My previous 5 carbon stars in Cassiopeia were X, ST, V623, W, and NQ. It is always a real treat to observe one of these extraordinary orange or red stars at the end of an observing session.

Thank you for reading.
Comments are well received at all times.

Clear skies from Aubrey.
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4 months 3 weeks ago - 4 months 3 weeks ago #108148 by Until_then-Goodnight!
Replied by Until_then-Goodnight! on topic Observations - 6/01/2020
Hi Aubrey, 

I hope all is well with you. Completely agree with you about how good the skies are at the moment. I would have liked to have been out a little more over the week....I have only managed to get out once so far, so very many thanks for providing us with your your observational report to read.

And congratulations on observing WW Cassiopeiae as that brings you to six carbon stars in Cassiopeia. Out of interest, would 2.6 be considered much variance for star magnitudes? 

Also, I find it intriguing to think about the ways in which religion and science have come together through astronomy. At times it is assumed that they cannot mix. However, history provides many accounts of how these seemingly polar opposites have worked in tandem with each other. Sure, only yesterday I was on the Vatican Observatory website. I found it an excellent source of information, and some very interesting work is being conducted there at the moment. 

As always kindest regards and clear skies to you, 

Darren. 
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4 months 3 weeks ago #108149 by flt158
Replied by flt158 on topic Observations - 6/01/2020
Hi Darren.

Yes - 2.6 magnitudes would be quite a big difference between minimum and maximum magnitudes. The whole world is talking about Betelgeuse right now - simply because it has faded by 1 whole magnitude. According to www.aavso.org way back in 2012 WW Cassiopeiae was faint at 11.0 in magnitude. It has been very much brighter since then. I don't know how many times brighter 9.1 is to 11.7. (I'm only an amateur astronomer after all.)
I also realised today that I have, in fact, observed 7 carbon stars in Cassiopeiae. I should have included WZ Cassiopeia. WZ Cas has 3 optical companions. All together they have the designation STTA 254. I am already checking out carbon star no. 8. Details to come soon.....

And yes! Science and religion have many strong links going down through the centuries. I only know a few more snippets about that. Both Father Johan Stein and Reverend Thomas Espin were 2 great double star discoverers. In the book of Job in the Bible the Pleiades and Orion are mentioned. But you, Darren, know about that. It was one of the quiz questions asked at the recent "Stars, comets and mince pies" at Dunsink Observatory.

I do hope you will do some more observing again soon, Darren. I always look forward to your own reports, my friend.

Clear skies from Aubrey.
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4 months 3 weeks ago #108150 by Until_then-Goodnight!
Replied by Until_then-Goodnight! on topic Observations - 6/01/2020
Good morning Aubrey,

Very many thanks for answering my question, that's much appreciated. Yes, in recent months there seems to be an increasing level of interest  Betelgeuse. Imagine if it was to go supernova during our lifetime...what a sight that would be. 

Ah yes, WZ Cassiopeiae! I'm looking forward to reading your report on the 8th Carbon star in Cassiopeia as you have a great knack for detailing your observations; it is like we're looking through the eyepiece ourselves. 

Now that you mention it, I do remember that question from the table quiz....That was a great night! I'm hoping to make it to COSMOS this year. In all liklihood it will probably be for one day, which is a shame, but I'm sure it will be still a great day out.

Speaking of days / evenings out are there any Sugar Loaf meet ups planned for January?

Not to worry if there's not, the back garden will suffice. 

Clear skies, 

Darren. 
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4 months 3 weeks ago #108151 by flt158
Replied by flt158 on topic Observations - 6/01/2020
Friday the 24th January is New Moon day. So that might be a runner, Darren.
But maybe 17th January is another option.
7 layers of clothing is going to be required for it either way!
Hot drinks all round has to be a good idea.

C* 3205 otherwise known as TYC 3651-650-1 on Guide 9.1 is my next target carbon star located in Cassiopeia. It is seriously faint at magnitude 11.4. Sigma Cassiopeiae will be my starting point. Sigma Cass is a wondrous double which I have already reported on.

Clear skies,

Aubrey.
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4 months 3 weeks ago #108152 by Until_then-Goodnight!
Replied by Until_then-Goodnight! on topic Observations - 6/01/2020
Excellent Aubrey, I'm happy to observe either night. I'll get the thermals ready! 

Best of luck with C* 3205, I'm really looking forward to hearing more about it. 

Clear skies,

Darren. 
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4 months 3 weeks ago #108153 by flt158
Replied by flt158 on topic Observations - 6/01/2020
Hi Darren.
Of course Met Eireann always has the last word.
They are saying we are going to have wet and windy weather for the next 7 days. Are they right this time? As Patrick Moore's used to say "I wonder".

Aubrey.
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4 months 2 weeks ago - 4 months 2 weeks ago #108154 by Until_then-Goodnight!
Replied by Until_then-Goodnight! on topic Observations - 6/01/2020
Hi Aubrey, We'll keep an eye on the weather for sure - today has certainly lived up to the forecast - that wind is wicked! And to think there was an eclipse tonight too. 

Clear skies, 
Darren. 

BTW, Love the Sir Patrick Moore quote...what a wonderful man. 
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4 months 2 weeks ago #108155 by flt158
Replied by flt158 on topic Observations - 6/01/2020
That's right, Darren.
There was the small matter of a penumbral lunar eclipse tonight.
There was plenty of blue sky at lunchtime today, But after the sun did set, there was no hope of seeing the Full Moon. Rain even arrived.

However I do have my Guide 9 map ready to that next carbon star in Cassiopeia.

Kind regards from Aubrey.
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