Observations - 15th March 2020

2 months 2 weeks ago - 2 months 2 weeks ago #108402 by flt158
Observations - 15th March 2020 was created by flt158
Hello, everyone.

As my church is closed for the next 3 weeks (at least), it was an easy decision for me to set up my William Optics 158 mm F/7 apochromatic refractor with its William Optics 70 mm F/6 small apo attached on the Berlebach Planet alt-az mount. Mirror diagonals are fitted to both scopes. Sunset occurred at 18.30 UT precisely. Winds were very light. Temperatures dropped from 8 to 2 degrees during this Sunday evening. I observed from 17.10 UT to 19.30. After dinner I continued from 20.30 to 23.15 UT. Better than any movie. Thankfully I recorded the snooker final. Watched that today Monday. It was a brilliant match! Anyway here is my report with 6 warm layers of clothing on yours truly.

1. At 17.13 I found Venus at 11X in the 70 mm small apo as a bright star. That's 1 hour 17 mins before sunset. I then proceeded to see her with my own eyes almost immediately. At a later stage, I could observe 27 Arietis (6.2 magnitude) 25 arc minutes to Venus' north. The star's spectral class is G5. And it did have a very nice strong yellow hue. Why can't all yellow stars look this good? But that's a rhetorical question. The shimmering sky conditions were not too bad as I increased my magnifications from 40X, 112X, 140X, 167X, 225X and 280X. Venus' angular diameter was 21.4". Its phase was less than 56% lit. Its distance was 116.474.000 kms from Earth. How I do look forward to seeing a half phased Venus sometime soon.

2. Now that sunset had happened, I thought I ought to look for those 2 famous bright stars in Gemini: Castor and Pollux. Pollux is definitely brighter despite its Beta Geminorum designation. I was delighted to find it in my small 70 mm apo at a mere 11X with its orange colour. Its magnitude is +1.2. Castor is a little under 6 degrees above and I found it at 18.37 UT - which is just 7 minutes after sunset; i.e. the star is still invisible. But not in my scopes! Now comes the real headline: Could I split it at a lower magnification than my usual 112X? Indeed I could! 40X was perfectly good to split A and B. The C star appeared at 18.45 UT. Again that was seen at 40X. The magnitudes are: A = 1.9. B = 3. C = 9.8. D is an optical 4th companion with a magnitude 10.1. But A, B and C are a true triple with separations 5.4", 69.8". PA's = 52 and 163 degrees. Magnificent!

The rest of these celestial objects are in Cancer.
All figures come from www.stelledoppie.it  

3. I had to start off with Zeta Cancri (Tegmine) yet again. My simple reason is it was such a calm evening. And my favourite triple star I relatively easy to find some 7 degrees west of M44 the Beehive Cluster. Split all 3 stars once again successfully at 167X and 225X.

4. Gamma Cancri (Asellus Borealis) is an optical double star. Magnitudes: A = 4.7. B = 10.2. Sep = 115.9". PA = 67 degrees. A is white. B is yellow. Both stars easily seen at 40X and 112X.

5. SLE 339 is an uncertain double star near M44. Magnitudes: A = 10.2. B = 10.2. Sep = 6.7". PA = 121 degrees. I could just about see the 2 stars split at 40X. But 112X was very good indeed. Can anyone tell me what SLE stands for? Thank you.

6. STF (Struve) 1269 is a true binary. Magnitudes: A = 10.5. B = 11.3. Sep = 11.4". PA = 309 degrees. Split at 112X.

7. Stf 1311 is a true binary and it is a real gem. Magnitudes: A = 6.9. B = 7.1. Sep = 7.8". PA = 199 degrees. I have observed it before some years ago. It's delightfully tight at 40X. And even nicer at 112X. Both stars are yellow - white.

8. BUP 127 is a true binary. Magnitudes: A = 8.1. B = 11.9. Sep = 60". PA = 171 degrees. Observed at 112X. A is yellow. That secondary is seriously faint. Can anyone find out for me what BUP stands for? Thank you.

9. STT 570 is an optical double. The A component is the same star as the bright component of BUP 127. Magnitudes: A = 8.1. B = 9.6. Sep = 75.1". PA = 78 degrees. STT stands for Otto Struve (1897 - 1963). Easily split at 40X and 112X.

10. STF 1332 is a true binary. Magnitudes: A = 7.9. B = 8.1. Sep = 5.9". PA = 29 degrees. Brilliantly tight at 40X. It is one I did observe in the past. 112X is very good also. Both stars are yellow - white. It's another true gem in Cancer.

11. AG 163 may be an optical double. Magnitudes: A = 10.2. B = 10.7. Sep = 5.1". PA = 320 degrees. Very nice at 112X with a decent amount of black space between them. It can be found quite near STF 1332. AG stands for Astronomische Gesellschaft.

12. HO 364 is an optical double. Magnitudes: A = 8.8. B = 11.8. Sep = 4.1". PA = 336 degrees. It's difficult to see B at 112X. But I got it nonetheless at that power. 140X and 167X were better. HO stands for George Washington Hough (1836 to 1909).

13. HDS 1318 Is a true binary. Magnitudes: A = 7.5. B = 10.6. Sep = 3.6". PA = 347 degrees. What a stubborn double this proved to be. You would think with that separation my scope would have no problem in splitting A and B. But I could not see B at 225X. I required 280X to catch the slightest glimpse of it. Seeing conditions must have deteriorated over the course of the night. 320X improved the observation of B. Check out HDS 1318 if you dare. Patience is needed for it. HDS stands for Hipparcos Catalog.

14. HJL 1052 is a true binary. Magnitudes: A = 8.5. B = 9.7. Sep = 64.3". PA = 326 degrees. Easily split at 40X and 112X. HJL stands for Jean Louis Halbwachs. I don't have any further information about the gentleman. Perhaps someone can fill us in. (?)

15. BRT 2391 is an optical double. Magnitudes: A = 9.7. B = 11.5. Sep = 7.6". PA = 45 degrees. The A component is the same B star as HJL 1052. Observed at 112X. As a triple star HJL 1052 and BRT 2391 are nothing special. They are just nice and close to M44. BRT stands for S. G Barton. Can anyone tell me anything more about this gentleman?

16 And so finally, I do have a carbon star for you. HD 78278 is my 4th observed carbon in Cancer - otherwise known as TYC 1407 294. It is easy to find very near Xi and 79 Cancri. Its magnitude is 10.7. Its spectral class is a simple C. I could see an orange coloured star alright; but it was not all that intense in my 6.2" refractor. Still happy to tick it off. It's my 82nd observed carbon star.

Thank you for reading.
Comments are always most welcome.

Clear skies,

Aubrey.
The following user(s) said Thank You: michael_murphy, Until_then-Goodnight!

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

2 months 2 weeks ago - 2 months 2 weeks ago #108403 by Until_then-Goodnight!
Replied by Until_then-Goodnight! on topic Observations - 15th March 2020
Hi Aubrey,

You put a great big smile on my face - your report was a fantastic read! Plenty of detail, and I completely agree with you when you say that a night out under the stars is better than any movie. I've yet to observe Venus this year. It tends to be in the front of my house come evening time, and I'm not sure what the neighbours might think of me sitting in an open driveway with my telescope! Then again, it might be a nice way to meet some of the neighbours. You never know they may even take to the hobby. But you've made a good case for me to view it regardless of what others think.

Well done on splitting splitting Castor on lower power - that's a great scope you have!

In terms of the abbreviation 'SLE', I think I may have found it. I did a little bit of searching and came up with Guy. Soulie (see  books.google.ie/books?id=BSiMBxcNs4cC&pg...20discoverer&f=false )

And here's some further information on the man himself: sirius-floirac.fr/category/histoire-du-site/ Doing a quick control and 'f' on your keyboard and entering 'soulie' in the search field will bring you to the info on Guy Soulie.  

I've yet to look-up 'BUP', but I will give it go for you. Likewise, I'll see what I can find on the other two gentlemen.

HDS 1318 seems like a real challenge, so well done on catching a glimpse of it.

And nice to finish up on another carbon star; they really are beautiful objects.

Take care and kindest regards,

Darren.

I just discovered that BUP stands for Burnham's 1913 proper motion catalog (see page 3 of  books.google.ie/books?id=3nKo-rxUArwC&pg...designations&f=false )
The following user(s) said Thank You: flt158

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

2 months 2 weeks ago #108404 by flt158
Replied by flt158 on topic Observations - 15th March 2020
Well, you're definitely putting some real excitement into me, Darren.
If SLE stands for Guy Soulié it turns out he may be still living even though he was born in 1920. That's 100 years ago!

Seemingly there is an asteroid named after Monsieur Soulié

It's okay regarding BUP.
That stands for Burnham Proper Motion Catalogue.

Brilliant! Thank you very much.

Clear skies from Aubrey.
The following user(s) said Thank You: Until_then-Goodnight!

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

2 months 2 weeks ago - 2 months 2 weeks ago #108405 by Until_then-Goodnight!
Replied by Until_then-Goodnight! on topic Observations - 15th March 2020
You were a step ahead of me there with BUP Aubrey : )

I'll say goodnight for now, and very many thanks for sharing that information on G. Soulie.

Chat soon,

Darren.
The following user(s) said Thank You: flt158

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

2 months 2 weeks ago #108406 by Fermidox
Replied by Fermidox on topic Observations - 15th March 2020
Good call Darren, it is indeed Guy Soulie. He died in 2015 Aubrey, still a good innings.

Finbarr.
The following user(s) said Thank You: flt158, Until_then-Goodnight!

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

2 months 2 weeks ago #108407 by flt158
Replied by flt158 on topic Observations - 15th March 2020
Oh! What a pity Guy Soulié has passed away in 2015.
The website I was looking at seemed to suggest he was alive.
He discovered 2 asteroids.
Another one was given his good name.

Thank you for finding out a little bit about him, Finbarr.

I'm going over to Cloudy Nights now.

Kind regards,

Aubrey.
The following user(s) said Thank You: Fermidox, Until_then-Goodnight!

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

2 months 2 weeks ago #108418 by Until_then-Goodnight!
Replied by Until_then-Goodnight! on topic Observations - 15th March 2020
Evening Aubrey and Finbarr,

I was sorry to read that Guy Soulié passed away, but what a legacy he left.

Clear skies,

Darren.
The following user(s) said Thank You: flt158

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

2 months 2 weeks ago #108420 by flt158
Replied by flt158 on topic Observations - 15th March 2020
As SLE 339 is relatively easy to split I should observe it one more time before Cancer leaves us.
I will think about this great man Guy Soulié as I observe it.

On another issue, according to www.aavso.org it appears the carbon star V Cancri is started to become brighter again.
And the only other carbon star in Cancer I need to observe is GM Cancri.

So let's see when we will have a clear night.

Kind regards,

Aubrey.
The following user(s) said Thank You: Until_then-Goodnight!

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

2 months 2 weeks ago #108423 by Until_then-Goodnight!
Replied by Until_then-Goodnight! on topic Observations - 15th March 2020
Very best of luck with that last carbon star in Cancer Aubrey.

Clear skies,

Darren.
The following user(s) said Thank You: flt158

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

2 months 2 weeks ago #108425 by flt158
Replied by flt158 on topic Observations - 15th March 2020
Well, Darren.
It turns out I have 2 carbon stars to seeks out in Cancer.

V Cancri was awoken!
One man on www.aavso.org has observed it and it is that little bit brighter right now.
While I'm at it I will check out X and T Cancri.
That means I might make it a night of observing carbon stars in Cancer whenever skies clear.
My Guide 9.1 DVD is seriously good in printing off maps of these stunning celestial objects.

Clear skies (when?)

Aubrey.
The following user(s) said Thank You: Until_then-Goodnight!

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

2 months 2 weeks ago - 2 months 2 weeks ago #108427 by Until_then-Goodnight!
Replied by Until_then-Goodnight! on topic Observations - 15th March 2020
Hi Aubrey, 

I see that now...my mistake!

Variable stars are fascinating objects, and I did not realise there are some in Cancer: Every day is a school day as they say.

I'm looking forward to getting out again. I've just checked Met Éireann, and it seems like there might be a short break in clouds Saturday and Sunday.

Clear skies,

Darren.
The following user(s) said Thank You: flt158

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

2 months 1 week ago #108428 by flt158
Replied by flt158 on topic Observations - 15th March 2020
That's okay, Darren.
Some carbon stars are variable.
But a lot are not.
I don't know what percentage.

There might be clear skies tonight Thursday.
But if not, another night will work.
Sure we're all house bound for many months to come.

Clear skies,

Aubrey.
The following user(s) said Thank You: Until_then-Goodnight!

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

2 months 1 week ago #108430 by Until_then-Goodnight!
Replied by Until_then-Goodnight! on topic Observations - 15th March 2020
Hi Aubrey,

Good call on the weather tonight. I've just returned from my back garden, but more about that tomorrow.

For now, many thanks for explaining how not all carbon stars are variable - much appreciated.

Clear skies,

Darren.
The following user(s) said Thank You: flt158

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

2 months 1 week ago - 2 months 1 week ago #108470 by Until_then-Goodnight!
Replied by Until_then-Goodnight! on topic Observations - 15th March 2020
Hi Aubrey,

I have some good news: I've managed to find some information on those other two astronomers that you mentioned in original post. Samuel G. Barton was a Professor of Astronomy at the University of Pennsylvania during the 1930s, and was selected as a representative of the American Astronomical Society (AAS) to serve on the General Committee for the 200th Anniversary of the Birth of David Rittenhouse. He was an advisory astronomy panel member for the magazine 'Wonder Stories', and translated from Latin the 'names of satellites' (see pages 8 -10).

books.google.ie/books?id=6YGqFZ_RPdQC&pg...%20astronomy&f=false

 He also wrote a number of books.

archive.org/details/guidetotheconste032859mbp/page/n5/mode/2up

And one you're probably more interested in:

books.google.ie/books?id=_9cUvwEACAAJ&si...c=buy&source=gbs_atb

Interestingly, he draws from the bible in some of his published work:

www.jstor.org/stable/15732?seq=1

I even managed to find a photo of him at one of the AAS's Meetings. Here is the photo; he's in the back row, 8th from the left (pretty much center), and next to the very tall man.

had.aas.org/sites/had.aas.org/files/mtg49-1932.jpg

And here is the 'Key to plate':

had.aas.org/sites/had.aas.org/files/mtg4...2identifications.jpg
The following user(s) said Thank You: flt158

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

2 months 1 week ago - 2 months 1 week ago #108471 by Until_then-Goodnight!
Replied by Until_then-Goodnight! on topic Observations - 15th March 2020
Believe or not, as I looked through other group photos from various AAS meetings, Struve can be seen. For example, here is another photo from one of the meetings:

had.aas.org/sites/had.aas.org/files/mtg51-1933.jpg

And here is the 'Key to plate':

had.aas.org/sites/had.aas.org/files/mtg5...3identifications.jpg

The other gentleman you mentioned in your posts, is still very active. The link below will give a flavour of what I mean:

www.iau.org/administration/membership/individual/6837/

I'm sure others have probably lots of additional information on those two individuals, but the above is a start.

Kindest regards,

Darren.

I had to split my post into two because I had too many links.
The following user(s) said Thank You: flt158

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

2 months 1 week ago #108473 by flt158
Replied by flt158 on topic Observations - 15th March 2020
Hi Darren.
This is truly amazing!
I wasn't expecting this enormous amount of information.
It seems I will be keeping an eye out for double stars with Samuel Barton designations in the future.
I'll check out the other links tomorrow.

Kindest regards,

Aubrey.
The following user(s) said Thank You: Until_then-Goodnight!

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

2 months 1 week ago #108475 by flt158
Replied by flt158 on topic Observations - 15th March 2020
Hi Darren.
It appears Jean-Louis Halbwachs is alive these days.
Someone is free to correct me.

Kind regards,

Aubrey.
The following user(s) said Thank You: Until_then-Goodnight!

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

2 months 1 week ago #108478 by Until_then-Goodnight!
Replied by Until_then-Goodnight! on topic Observations - 15th March 2020
You're more than welcome Aubrey. You're always so generous with knowledge and your equipment; think of it as my way of saying 'thanks'.

In all honestly, I like hunting down information, and it's a nice way to learn more about this wonderful hobby. So, no trouble at all!

I thought he might, as his IAU profile is fairly up-to-date. How many more discoveries will he make in our lifetime? 

Kindest regards, 

Darren. 
The following user(s) said Thank You: flt158

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Time to create page: 0.121 seconds
Powered by Kunena Forum