Observations - 30/10/20

3 weeks 3 days ago #109614 by flt158
Observations - 30/10/20 was created by flt158
Hello everyone.

I did some early evening observing on Friday 30th October 2020 with my William Optics 158 mm F/7 apochromatic refractor in my back garden from 5.15 pm until 7 pm. Sunset occurred at 16.55 UT. The temperatures went down from 4 degrees C to 2 degrees. There was no wind whatsoever. The sky was very clear. I started with some old favourite double stars. Their figures are be checked on www.stelledoppie.it

1. Polaris is a true binary. Magnitudes: A = 2. B = 9.1. Sep = 18.4". PA = 236 degrees. But this time I was splitting it at 5.15 pm when the star was still invisible. The primary is yellow-white (F7). The secondary is white. It was very nice to see the secondary in the 10 o'clock position at 40X. Because of our Earth's rotation, the companion seems to go around the primary in a clockwise movement hour by hour through my scope. What fun! Of course there is precious little change going on with the true position angle. That has remained quite fixed over many years.

2. We all remember observing the constellation of Bootes about 5 months ago. It is a Spring time set of stars after all in the north eastern sky. Well, now Arcturus is setting in the north western sky. Its golden-orange K2 colour was simply glorious at 40X.

3. Straight up from Arcturus we have Izar which I found at 5.30 pm when it was still invisible to my eyes. Magnitudes: A = 2.6. B = 4.8. Sep = 2.8". PA = 347 degrees. Beautiful (Pulcherrima) split at 112X, 140X and 167X. The primary is yellow with a bit of orange. The secondary is slight dark blue.

4. Off now to Cassiopeia. Schedar (Alpha Cassiopeiae) is an optical double. As B & C are not visible in my scope, I have to make to do A & D. Magnitudes: A = 2.4. B = 9. Sep = 70.4". PA = 283 degrees. Very easy split at 40X of course. The primary is yellow.

5. Very close by is Achird (Eta Cassiopeiae). For those who haven't observed this true binary - you don't know what you are missing! Magnitudes: A = 3.5. B = 7.4. Sep = 13.4". PA = 326.6 degrees. But the colours are stunning. The primary is G1V yellow. The secondary is M. My scope sees it as almond brown. I know I have told you all about Achird before. But I do reckon it is worthwhile to put it up for discussion yet again. There is an optical C component whose magnitude is 10.2 and it is 75.6" from the primary. The PA is 126 degrees. Tonight I only used 40X to see all 3 stars. Other times I increase up to 112X. Achird is still my favourite 4th magnitude true binary.

6. STF 10 is next. A & B are a true binary. But C is optical. Magnitudes: A = 8. B = 8.6. C = 11.1. Sep's = 17.5" & 55.4" from A. PA = 176 and 103 degrees respectively. All 3 white stars split at 40X.

7. The reason I did observe STF 10 again is because there is an extremely faint carbon star near it. And what a weird Simbad designation it has including those square brackets: [I81] C 8. It is otherwise called GSC 04018-00410 and its spectral class is C. Stars whose designations start with GSC are very popular on my Guide 9 DVD and on Simbad also. So if anyone can explain that original designation - please explain it to the rest of us. Thank you.
The carbon star's magnitude varies from different sources. Simbad says it is 11.5 with the ~ symbol after that estimate. Presumably that makes it a variable star. Guide 9.1 DVD gives 14.0. Which means there is no way was I going to see it - especially with a Full Moon in the sky at the same time. I also checked the AAVSO website who give a magnitude of +12.9. So maybe I am going to see it. They also give this carbon star a very long designation: ZTF J001501.46+631209.8. These figures turn out to be the Right Ascension and the Declination of GSC 04018-00410.
The ZTF stands for Zwicky Transient Facility. I have since found out more about the ZTF on Google. It is a new time-domain survey which had its first light at the famous Palomar Observatory in 2017. Why the good people at AAVSO are using the ZTF abbreviation is beyond me. So please feel to explain that to the rest of us too. The ZTF system is used to observe Near Earth Objects {NEO's} and supernovae at Palomar.
Anyway, back to our carbon star. GSC 04018-00410. With that estimated +12.9 magnitude in mind I set out to find it. It was NOT easy. Although the star is right next to an 11.5 magnitude star called TYC 4018 1946 I saw the carbon star only once directly at 374X. 4 times I saw it using averted vision with that same magnification. I should also point out that there is another orange star which is shown on my Guide 9.1 DVD very close by and it is called 3UC307-007505. It has a magnitude of +12.3 and I saw it too. Therefore if anyone wishes to have a go at GSC 04018-00410, please do make sure you can see these 2 stars individually. This carbon star is the 15th I have observed in Cassiopeia; and my 92nd overall.

Thank you for reading my report which ended at 7 pm.

Comments and images are very welcome.
I would love to see an image of the carbon star GSC 04018-00410 and the surrounding area. Thank you in anticipation.

Clear skies from Aubrey.
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3 weeks 2 days ago - 3 weeks 2 days ago #109616 by Until_then-Goodnight!
Replied by Until_then-Goodnight! on topic Observations - 30/10/20
Hello Aubrey, 

Very many thanks for your report. It is full of lovely objects. Your description of Polaris was excellent. Seeing the secondary move around the primary sound exciting alright. 

As for those stars in Bootes, you brought me right back down memory lane. As you might recall, I spent most of March and April observing objects in the constellation, and it was a most enjoyable couple of months. So, it was great to read your description of Arcturus and Izar. 

Also, a big congratulations for bagging another Carbon star...well done! 

As you were brining your scope indoors I had was taking my one outside in the hope of sketching the Moon. As the primary mirror was cooling I decided to nip across to Tesco, but by the time I returned home I was greeted with a cloudy sky. So, I was delighted to read you made the most of yesterday's clear sky. 

No chance of a good sky tonight I suppose. 

Clear skies and Happy Halloween!

Darren. 
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3 weeks 2 days ago #109617 by flt158
Replied by flt158 on topic Observations - 30/10/20
Hello, everyone again. 

I am sorry about the duplication of my report. 
I thought I ought to try and put in an emoji. 
But it appears that the emoji menu which is on this website is still not working. 
Perhaps one of our moderators could look into the problem.
I would like to thank all those for their thank you's and the comments from Stephen and Darren.  

Anyway I did see a flashing satellite on Friday night passing near Cassiopeia as I was bagging those goodies. I'm not sure which one if was. Maybe it was Cosmos 1892. But I'm probably incorrect.
Plus I did see a faint meteor with my own eyes which must have been a Taurid. 

Please ignore my question in regards to linking the AAVSO website  with the Zwicky Transient Facility. As ZTF has been up and running for over 3 years, I would suggest that the carbon star [I81] C 8 has some other designations which are truly authentic. ZTF has made excellent progress in listing so many thousands of stars of magnitudes going right down to +20.5. 

But I would still like to know about the very strange designation [I81] C 8. Where did that come from?
I should ask the good people of AAVSO. In fact I will!

Clear skies from Aubrey. 

 
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3 weeks 2 days ago #109618 by Fermidox
Replied by Fermidox on topic Observations - 30/10/20
Hi Aubrey,

I'm not sure if you've seen the image of GSC 04018-00410 on Simbad so I've added it below. It's right next to that TYC star, and the third star of similar mag is close by, although it doesn't look very orange. As for the [I81] C 8 designation, Simbad tells us it stands for T. Ichikawa, presumably a Japanese astronomer, and his 1981 work, 'The space distribution of M giants in the direction of Cas'. C 8 is more than likely the 8th such star in Cassiopeia he identified for that paper.

All the best,
Finbarr.

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3 weeks 2 days ago #109619 by flt158
Replied by flt158 on topic Observations - 30/10/20
Thank you, Finbarr!
I did see that Simbad image alright.
And you are indeed 100% correct in regards to T. Ichikawa.
I have since discovered his name on Simbad.
I just had to click on the beginning of the [I81] label.
But I still don't know his first name.
I wonder what the "T" stands for.
It's very clear those Japanese astronomers are highly skilled imagers and observers.

Great detective work, Finbarr!

Very best regards from Aubrey.
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3 weeks 2 days ago #109620 by Fermidox
Replied by Fermidox on topic Observations - 30/10/20
It's 'Takashi', Aubrey -

adsabs.harvard.edu/full/1981PASJ...33..107I

How did we survive before the internet ? :D

Finbarr.
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3 weeks 2 days ago #109621 by flt158
Replied by flt158 on topic Observations - 30/10/20
Ha Ha, Finbarr.
Indeed. Where would we be without the internet?

That's truly amazing.
Don't Takahashi manufacture telescopes of all types including refractors?
And rather good ones too.
Takahashi Ichikawa it is then.

Now when we going to have another clear night?
My next carbon star ought to be of some interest to some of us.

Watch this space!

Aubrey.
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3 weeks 2 days ago #109622 by Fermidox
Replied by Fermidox on topic Observations - 30/10/20
I think it's Takashi rather than Takahashi Aubrey... they are great scopes by all accounts - if you've got the cash that is ;)

Finbarr.
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3 weeks 2 days ago #109623 by flt158
Replied by flt158 on topic Observations - 30/10/20
Thank you for correcting me, Finbarr.
I have just published a report of [I81] C 8 on Cloudy Nights.
So I'm okay on getting his name right now. Just in time - Phew!

There is one man I know who does own a Takahashi apochromatic refractor and he is a member of the Irish Astronomical Society. But I won't give his name here.

Clear skies,

Aubrey.
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3 weeks 2 days ago #109624 by lunartic
Replied by lunartic on topic Observations - 30/10/20
It is Takahashi, Aubrey.

Programming today is a race between software engineers striving to build bigger and better programs, and the universe trying to produce bigger and better idiots. So far, the universe is winning.

Rich Cook
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3 weeks 2 days ago - 3 weeks 2 days ago #109625 by flt158
Replied by flt158 on topic Observations - 30/10/20
Sorry, Paul. 
But what is Takahashi?
Is that the Japanese astronomer's first name?

Aubrey.

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3 weeks 2 days ago #109626 by flt158
Replied by flt158 on topic Observations - 30/10/20
Oh! It's just dawned on me.
It's one of Paul's jokes!!
You very nearly caught me out yet again.
Good one, Paul.

Aubrey.
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3 weeks 1 day ago #109627 by Fermidox
Replied by Fermidox on topic Observations - 30/10/20
Those lists you got on Cloudynights should keep you going for a while alright Aubrey :)

I notice though that 'The NGC IC Observing List Generator' on the second list is a dead link - there used to be a lot of good info on that site including references to the Birr telescope. I think some pages from it are still available on the Wayback machine.

All the best,
Finbarr.
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3 weeks 1 day ago #109628 by flt158
Replied by flt158 on topic Observations - 30/10/20
I see Monday night 2nd November is supposed to be clear.
So it will be time to see what other goodies in Cassiopeia are available for mise.

Clear skies,

Aubrey.
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3 weeks 9 hours ago #109630 by Until_then-Goodnight!
Replied by Until_then-Goodnight! on topic Observations - 30/10/20
Here's hoping so. I spent time over the weekend cleaning eyepieces, finders scopes, and filters. It was a bit like the trick and treaters: All dressed up and nowhere to go :) 

Clear skies, 
Darren. 
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3 weeks 4 hours ago #109631 by flt158
Replied by flt158 on topic Observations - 30/10/20
I have decided to wait until Tuesday night as the wind is still strong for Monday night.
There will be much calmer conditions tomorrow and the skies will be good and clear again.

I've to seek out a real gem.

Best regards from Aubrey.
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2 weeks 6 days ago #109634 by Until_then-Goodnight!
Replied by Until_then-Goodnight! on topic Observations - 30/10/20
Looks good out there... Here's to a good night's observing gents! 
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