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100th carbon star observed - 24/032021

2 weeks 6 days ago #110075 by flt158
Hello, everyone here on IFAS. 

I set up my William Optics 158 mm F/7 apochromatic refractor in my back garden on both Wednesday 24th March and Thursday 25th March 2021. 
On both nights there was quite a noticeable wind - especially on Thursday night when its speed was up to 24 km/h. 
The air temperatures were between +4 and 6 degrees Celsius on both nights. 

My 100th carbon star took top priority of course. And I wanted it to be a bright one which I have never observed before. 
I had printed off a Guide 9.1 DVD map. 
Having centred the carbon star candidate on this map, it was relatively easy to find BM Geminorum near the bright magnitude +5 star 57 Geminorum. 

BM Geminorum has many designations on Simbad: HD 57160, BD+25 1643, GSC 01913-01170, TYC 1913-1170-1 and HIP 35617 to name a number of them. 
Its magnitude does not vary much: from +8.2 down to 8.6. Its spectral class is C5 or N4. 

I had no difficulties locating BM Gem at a mere 40X. But I must say it is surrounded by quite a bunch of field stars. Indeed, including BM Gem, I can easily see there are 8 stars. However there was no problem figuring out which one was the carbon. 
In my 2021 diary I have written it is bright and very good in its appearance. 
Its orange hue is good and intense. That's what my wife Valerie said. 

Therefore if anyone here has the desire to observe BM Gem, I would say you would find it an enjoyable experience.
I managed to observe it at powers 40X, 112X, 140X, 167X, 225X and I finished up at 280X. 

Even on Thursday night, I had to have another look at it.  

BM Geminorum is the 6th carbon star I have observed in Gemini. 

And I am greatly rejoicing it is my 100th carbon star. 

By the way, I am of the persuasion my Triune God (Father, Son and Holy Spirit) created each star I observe in the entire heavens whether carbon or non-carbon. 
It was in December 2000 when I observed T Lyrae which was my very first carbon star. (How the years have passed!)

Thank you very much for reading my report. 

Star hopping to carbon stars is great fun!

Clear skies from Aubrey.  
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2 weeks 6 days ago #110078 by Fermidox
Replied by Fermidox on topic 100th carbon star observed - 24/032021
Well done on having the perseverance and discipline to make it all the way to 100 Aubrey.

Can I ask - which was the brightest... the faintest... and your favourite among them all?

Thanks and clear skies,
Finbarr.
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2 weeks 6 days ago - 2 weeks 6 days ago #110079 by Until_then-Goodnight!
Replied by Until_then-Goodnight! on topic 100th carbon star observed - 24/032021
Hi Aubrey,

It seems that my reply to you yesterday was not posted here??? 

I was saying that I was delighted to see you reached 100 carbon stars, and that you shared the moment with Valerie.

To think that this project started back in 2000 further confirms my opinion that you are an inspiration to me and I'm sure many others. 

Once again, a HUGE congratulations to you. Next time we're back at the Sugar Loaf I'll shake your hand - until then, here's a virtual 'high five'. 

Clear skies, 

Darren. 
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2 weeks 5 days ago #110082 by flt158
Replied by flt158 on topic 100th carbon star observed - 24/032021
Hello, Finbarr. 

I very much thank you for your most kind opening comment. 
And now to answer your questions individually. 
My brightest carbon is a toss up between TX Piscium and U Hydrae. 
They both can be as bright as +4.8. 
I first observed TX Piscium on the 5th January 2001. 
U Hydrae I first observed 22nd April 2015. 
My faintest was Case 717. 
Its magnitude was +13.2 and I observed on the 1st February 2019. 
My personal favourite is R Leporis which I observed on the 27th January 2012. 
That was simply because it was the richest orange-red star I have ever seen.

Clear skies from Aubrey.   
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2 weeks 5 days ago #110085 by Fermidox
Replied by Fermidox on topic 100th carbon star observed - 24/032021
Very interesting Aubrey, thanks. So Hind's Crimson Star deserves its moniker in that case.

Best of luck with your next 100!

Finbarr.
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