I'm just about to start.

13 years 8 months ago #27862 by ryanmcmanus
I'm just about to start. was created by ryanmcmanus
Hello all,

I am about to by mu first telescope details below. I just would like your thoughts on some stuff.

1. is the telescope good enough to see some galaxies and the like?

2. Is there like a guide to knowing how to find specific things in the sky?

* Powerful reflector telescope

* Adjustable Aluminium Tripod

* Precise rack & pinion focussing

* Spherical aluminised mirror

* Micro altitude control

* Optimum magnification x 175

* Focus length of the object mirror : 700mm

* Focus length of the eyepiece : 4mm



:twisted:

As I know nothing really, truly I must be the wisest of all.

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13 years 8 months ago #27863 by ryanmcmanus
Replied by ryanmcmanus on topic I'm just about to start.
sorry also.

* 20mm-1.25in (x35) Eyepiece

* 12.5mm-1.25in (x55) Eyepiece

* 4mm-1.25in (x175) Eyepiece

* Barlow Lens (2 x-1.25in) giving 70 x when used with the 20mm eyepiece, 110 x when used with the 12.5mm eyepiece, and 350 x when used with the 4mm eyepiece

* Erecting Eyepiece (1.5 x-1.25) giving 52.5 x when used with the 20mm eyepiece, 82.5 x when used with the 12.5mm eyepiece, and 262.5 x when used with the 4mm eyepiece

* Sighting scope

* Foldable Aluminium Tripod

* Accessory dish

As I know nothing really, truly I must be the wisest of all.

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13 years 8 months ago #27866 by jeyjey
Replied by jeyjey on topic I'm just about to start.

1. is the telescope good enough to see some galaxies and the like?

You don't mention the aperture (the most important thing for faint fuzzies), but I'm going to guess 100mm or 114mm based on the focal length. That would show you galaxies at a dark site, but not from within 50 miles of Dublin. There is other good stuff to look at, mind you (planets, some of the brighter nebula, double stars and star clusters).

2. Is there like a guide to knowing how to find specific things in the sky?

Yes, there are many guides. I'm a GoTo guy myself, though, so I'm not familiar with which are the best ones. I'm sure someone else will chime in....

Oh, and welcome to the forums!

-- Jeff.

Nikon 18x70s / UA Millennium                              Colorado:
Solarscope SF70 / TV Pronto / AP400QMD             Coronado SolarMax40 DS / Bogen 055+3130
APM MC1610 / Tak FC-125 / AP1200GTO               Tak Mewlon 250 / AP600EGTO

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13 years 8 months ago #27867 by voyager
Replied by voyager on topic I'm just about to start.
What size is the actual mirror? That's the most important thing of all appart from the quality of the actual optics.

From the blurb posted there I'd be very sucpicious, it sounds like one of the very low quality scopes sold in camera shops by people like Tasco or in suprtmarkets.

Can you give us a make and model?

My Home Page - www.bartbusschots.ie

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13 years 8 months ago #27872 by Seanie_Morris
Replied by Seanie_Morris on topic I'm just about to start.
It sounds to me like Ryan perhaps has a 74 to 80mm reflector.

Ryan,
with this kind of scope, you won't be seeing many galaxies at all. Only the brighter more well-known ones, like Andromeda, as it is bright enough (even though it will still appear faint in such a sized scope!).

You will however, enjoy nice, albeit, small views of Jupiter, Saturn, Venus, Mars, and brighter celestial objects like The Orion Nebula (M42), Perseus Double Cluster, Dumbell Nebula, and many more.

If you have some model information on what you have, that will be a big help. There are already some FAQ threads on the Skylux 70mm, and ETX-70 AT scopes, on these forums, which are similar sized scopes.

Enjoy!

Seanie.

Midlands Astronomy Club.
Radio Presenter (Midlands 103), Space Enthusiast, Astronomy Outreach Co-ordinator.
Former IFAS Chairperson and Secretary.

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13 years 8 months ago #27880 by ryanmcmanus
Replied by ryanmcmanus on topic I'm just about to start.
the description didn't mention the aperture or mirror size. You guys say this is the most import stuff. In which case I feel that may be I was about to be ripped off, plus I though it was very cheap too cheap even. I'll have a look on the other posts, get more information on telescopes. I'm just getting my 1st one, it's weird i'm 22 and been in to space and physics for a long time and have never bothered getting my self one. Stupid really I lived 7 miles outside of Enniskillen for a long time.

Thanks for all your information it will help me, of that I have no doubts. However, I'm a real amature :roll:

Also, the pictures that I have seen here. Is the special equipment I need to capture and image? I mean I can just place the lens of my camera to the telescope :lol:

As I know nothing really, truly I must be the wisest of all.

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13 years 8 months ago #27881 by ryanmcmanus
Replied by ryanmcmanus on topic I'm just about to start.
idealy, could someone recomend a telescope. Within not to extream price range?

As I know nothing really, truly I must be the wisest of all.

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13 years 8 months ago #27883 by ftodonoghue
Replied by ftodonoghue on topic I'm just about to start.
Before you decide on a telescope, why not consider a good pair of binoculars. These will allow you to see almost as much as the telescope you are considering purchasing and will be much cheaper. Also you will always have the binoculars. If you plumb for a small starter scope, you will no doubt wish to trade up to something bigger with time. If you are keen on a scope, check out the british astronomy magazines such as "astronomy now" and BBC's "Sky at Night"..These will give you ideas of prices for starter telescopes, also have a look under the links section on these boards and you will find liks to website selling scopes. All the best with your search,

Cheers
Trevor

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13 years 8 months ago #27886 by Eirikg
Replied by Eirikg on topic I'm just about to start.

the description didn't mention the aperture or mirror size. You guys say this is the most import stuff. In which case I feel that may be I was about to be ripped off, plus I though it was very cheap too cheap even. I'll have a look on the other posts, get more information on telescopes. I'm just getting my 1st one, it's weird i'm 22 and been in to space and physics for a long time and have never bothered getting my self one. Stupid really I lived 7 miles outside of Enniskillen for a long time.

Thanks for all your information it will help me, of that I have no doubts. However, I'm a real amature :roll:

Also, the pictures that I have seen here. Is the special equipment I need to capture and image? I mean I can just place the lens of my camera to the telescope :lol:


I got a small scope my self, ETX 70. I can barly see andromeda. This scope got a ok lens, but the eyepieces thats comes with it isnt that good. Using it to take pictures of nebulas and galaxes will work, the problem is that the motor that tracks the sky will have errors, so the stars wont be round if you expose the image for 1-2minutes or more. The images posted here is usaly more then 1-2 min. So for astrophotography you need a good mount/motor.

When taking pictures of galaxes or nabulas most ppl use a dslr were you can remove the lens. So with adapters you then connect it to the scope, using the scope as one lens.

Planets/moon:
You can place the camera over the eyepiece, but it wont be as good as pictures here taken with webcams with lots of frames stacked togheter for best detail.

Also you would like different kind of scope, for plants higher magnification (with of cource goooood optics) for nebulas and galaxes you would like a fast scope, thats is one with wider view and gathers more light.

How much would you spend on equpiment?

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13 years 8 months ago #27887 by michaeloconnell
Replied by michaeloconnell on topic I'm just about to start.
As above, I also would definitely recommend a good quality pair of binoculars and a deck chair. It will make it much easier to get into the hobby.

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13 years 8 months ago #27888 by Eirikg
Replied by Eirikg on topic I'm just about to start.

As above, I also would definitely recommend a good quality pair of binoculars and a deck chair. It will make it much easier to get into the hobby.


But "standard" binoculars wont have that much magnification to let you see like jupiter. And you wont get the wow thingy that most get when they see it :D In my binoculars its just a bright dot. But in the etx70 scope and could see it pretty good.

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13 years 8 months ago #27891 by michaeloconnell
Replied by michaeloconnell on topic I'm just about to start.
True. However, there are two advantages to using binoculars first before a scope:

1) Getting used to magnification: if one owns a scope before becoming reasonably familiar with the night sky, one might have very few interesting targets to aim at. Binoculars would allow one to sweep large areas of the night sky, especially the Milky Way without requiring an indepth knowledge of the night sky to enjoy it.

2) For the most part, and I am aware of a few exceptions via Lidl, a reasonably-priced pair of binos can be picked up for the same price as a rubbish telescope. Most people starting out are not willing to spend vast sums of money on the hobby without knowing how much they will enjoy it. Therefoe, it's better to buy quality binos than a rubbish telescope. If one finds that astronomy is not for them, at least one has a good pair of binos, which can be used for sighseeing, horse racing, sailing, etc...ie the investment isn't wasted.

What really reinforces this view is due to something that happened recently. I was looking at the Moon with a mother and daughter. The young child had a really cheap telecope which probably came from Santa. They both asked me to help them with it. I swear, I could not even point it properly at the Moon, no matter how hard I tried. If I were to set the telescope on a mountain of jelly, it would have been easier. It was just a disaster. However, I didn't have the heart to tell them they had bought a piece of rubbish. A pair of binos woulod have been far more useful and enjoyable.
This is what can happen when one buys really cheap gear.

Clear skies,

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13 years 8 months ago #27892 by voyager
Replied by voyager on topic I'm just about to start.
I'm also gonna agree with the Binoculars suggestion.

There are two reasons why I'd recomend Binoculars first:
1) They are much better value for money than a cheap telescope. They will last a lifetime and you will always get pleasure out of them were as a cheap telescope will not do you long.
2) You won't be able to use a telescope immediately. The sky is very very big and when you look at it through a telescope you only see a very very small part of it. The vast vast majority of the sky is empty so the chances of seeing anything interesting by just swining a small telescope skyward randomly are tiny. In order to see anything interesting you need to develop the skills to navigate your way round the sky using techniques like "star hopping". Binoculars are the ideal tool for learning your way round the sky. Once you get good at knowing the sky and finding your way round it with binocular then you are ready to get a telescope, but not before then. If you start off with a telescope you won't be able to find anything but the moon and perhaps Jupiter and Saturn and you'll probably get discouraged and perhaps even pack it in all together.

Good binoculars are the ideal first telescope!

My Home Page - www.bartbusschots.ie

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13 years 8 months ago #27902 by martinastro
Replied by martinastro on topic I'm just about to start.
Hi Ryan

Welcome onboard. Be wary of any telescope that advertise's magnification without a mention of its aperture! As said before aperture is the most important quality of any telesope and this alone will determine how many deep sky objects you will see. Do you have a pic of this scope or website we can visit to check it out?

Binoculars would be a great way to start, you wont have much magnification but you will have a large field of view which will help you locate objects more easily and celestial objects like star clusters, Orion nebula and M31 will look a treat, the darker your sky the more you will see....i wish you the best of luck and make sure to let us know how you get on!

Clear skies

Martin Mc Kenna

coruscations attending the whole length of the luminosity, giving to the phenomena the aspect of a wrathful messenger, and not that of a tranquil body pursuing a harmless course..comet of 1680

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13 years 8 months ago #27904 by DaveGrennan
Replied by DaveGrennan on topic I'm just about to start.
I would also agree with what has been said above and add.

The spec mentions a spherical mirror. Thats usually VERY bad. Proper astronomical telescopes normally use a mirror with a parabolic shape. Generally a spherical shape will not allow all the colours of the spectrum to be focussed together. This means you end with with nasty ghost blue fringes around bright objects. These scopes tend to come on very unsteady mounts which makes the job of finding something and keeping it in the field of view very difficult and frustrating.

Do you have a model and make for this telescope?

Also what is your budget? Unfortunately good quality telescopes do not come cheap but the good news is you can get very high quality binoculars for the same sort of money as a small cheap telescope and you WILL see much more stuff like some galaxies and nebulae and beautiful star clusters etc. As the guys said you will not be able to see surface detail on planets.

Couple a good pair of binoculars with a decent book, for example, 'Exploring the Night Sky with Binoculars' by Patrick Moore, or 'Turn Left at Orion' is good too. You will get the maximum value for money this way.

Also look out in the 'For Sale' forum here often you will find decent used telescopes going for far less than you would pay in the shops.

Regards and Clear Skies,

Dave.
J41 - Raheny Observatory.
www.webtreatz.com
Equipment List here

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13 years 8 months ago #27907 by DaveGrennan
Replied by DaveGrennan on topic I'm just about to start.

Also, the pictures that I have seen here. Is the special equipment I need to capture and image? I mean I can just place the lens of my camera to the telescope :lol:


Ryan I guess from the :lol: you already know the answer to that one!

However astroimaging can be as easy or as complex as you want it to be.
If you mean the high resolution images of galaxies and nebulae etc you are talking about quite complex setups involving often multiple cameras and computer software. However even some of the very detailed planetary photos can be taken with reasonably modest equipment.
(Have a look at the end of this post, and other users posts, for a link to he equipment I use for this)

When considering a telescope try and stretch the budget to include a mounting which has an electronic drive system to track the stars or at least be upgradeable in the future.

Remember even putting your camera on a tripod and taking a shot of the Moon against the foreground can be very rewarding.

Regards and Clear Skies,

Dave.
J41 - Raheny Observatory.
www.webtreatz.com
Equipment List here

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13 years 8 months ago #27916 by ftodonoghue
Replied by ftodonoghue on topic I'm just about to start.

I would also agree with what has been said above and add.

Couple a good pair of binoculars with a decent book, for example, 'Exploring the Night Sky with Binoculars' by Patrick Moore, or 'Turn Left at Orion' is good too. You will get the maximum value for money this way.


dont forget to take a look at the three free handbooks on this site. One for the beginner, one for binocular users and one for deep sky objects for telescopes or large binoculars. All are excellent publications
You will find them all on the link below and they are called observing challenges
http://www.irishastronomy.org/observers/challenges/index.php

Cheers
Trevor

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13 years 8 months ago #27935 by Macros42
Replied by Macros42 on topic I'm just about to start.

The spec mentions a spherical mirror. Thats usually VERY bad. Proper astronomical telescopes normally use a mirror with a parabolic shape.


Consider the blurb also mentions the "focus length of the mirror" I wouldn't put too much faith in the description (for the OP it should be focal length of the scope not the mirror). I agree with Bart - it's the blurb of a camera shop or Aldi telescope. It might even be good for astrology :D

I second the lads - get some binos. Lidl might have some of their Bresser ones left for the next couple of days. After that I recommend not getting a GoTo. I took Albert's advice on that and I'm glad I did - I learn more from manual scanning that I ever would just pushing buttons.

Steve
--
"Common sense is the collection of prejudices acquired by age eighteen" -- Albert Einstein

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13 years 8 months ago #27937 by pmgisme
Replied by pmgisme on topic I'm just about to start.
Its probably the Bushnell telescope reviewed here.

www.mav-magazine.com/Dec1999/Contents/bushnell/index.htm

Spherical optics!
Dont touch if you want to magnify above 25!

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13 years 8 months ago #27943 by jeyjey
Replied by jeyjey on topic I'm just about to start.
It's worth noting that there's nothing wrong with a spherical mirror as long as the spot diagram fits within the Airy disk. For an 8" Newt, this is true at f/12 and slower. I'm not exactly sure how this scales, but I think a 4" Newt with a spherical mirror is fine down to about f/9.

-- Jeff.

Nikon 18x70s / UA Millennium                              Colorado:
Solarscope SF70 / TV Pronto / AP400QMD             Coronado SolarMax40 DS / Bogen 055+3130
APM MC1610 / Tak FC-125 / AP1200GTO               Tak Mewlon 250 / AP600EGTO

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13 years 8 months ago #27979 by Jared Macphester
Replied by Jared Macphester on topic I'm just about to start.

It's worth noting that there's nothing wrong with a spherical mirror as long as the spot diagram fits within the Airy disk. For an 8" Newt, this is true at f/12 and slower. I'm not exactly sure how this scales, but I think a 4" Newt with a spherical mirror is fine down to about f/9.

-- Jeff.


Is it not the case that the mirror in an SCT is spherical and that the huge variety of variations on the theme come from the use of different corrector/secondary treatment? It's only in Newts that the mirror needs to be strictly parabolic.

I know, I know. I'm only asking!

JMP

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13 years 8 months ago #27980 by TrevorDurity
Replied by TrevorDurity on topic I'm just about to start.
That's true. Maksutov's and Schmidts use spherical mirrors. Newts should use parabaloidal ones so that all wavelengths get focused to a single point.

As mentioned above spherical mirrors are serious nono on newtonians. They are much easier to make, hence the price difference.

I would go for a 6 inch dob or a 80mm refractor as a starter scope. Don't make my mistake and start with something with a huge focal ratio (skywatcher mak). It is much much easier to find your way around the sky with a faster scope, say f6 or so, because you get a larger field of view.

Skywatcher make some great starter scopes.

Trev

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13 years 8 months ago #27986 by Matthew C
Replied by Matthew C on topic I'm just about to start.
In my opinion, i think the skylux is well suited to you! Its aperture is 70mm. its a great scope! i have one! great optics, every christmas there in lidl for €69! cheap as chips! but im sure you wouldnt want to wait that long! also there is an etx 70 for €170 which is also cheap for this scope! this scope is motorised! well hope i helped somewhat!

Good luck with your scope search!
Matthew

We shall not cease from exploration
And the end of all our exploring
Will be to arrive where we started
And know the place for the first time. . . .
T. S. Eliot
A wise man....

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13 years 8 months ago #27996 by jeyjey
Replied by jeyjey on topic I'm just about to start.

It's worth noting that there's nothing wrong with a spherical mirror as long as the spot diagram fits within the Airy disk. For an 8" Newt, this is true at f/12 and slower. I'm not exactly sure how this scales, but I think a 4" Newt with a spherical mirror is fine down to about f/9.

-- Jeff.


Is it not the case that the mirror in an SCT is spherical and that the huge variety of variations on the theme come from the use of different corrector/secondary treatment? It's only in Newts that the mirror needs to be strictly parabolic.

I know, I know. I'm only asking!

JMP

Yes, that's correct. Spherical mirrors are much cheaper to make, so the various CAT designs use various correctors to allow a spherical primary to function as if it were a paraboloid.

(As a really minor nit, a "parabolic" curve is 2D (similar to a circle, not a sphere) -- a "paraboloid" is the 3D shape.)

If anyone's interested in all this nonsense, I highly reccommend Rutten & van Venrooij's "Telescope Optics". You can't beat it.

-- Jeff.

Nikon 18x70s / UA Millennium                              Colorado:
Solarscope SF70 / TV Pronto / AP400QMD             Coronado SolarMax40 DS / Bogen 055+3130
APM MC1610 / Tak FC-125 / AP1200GTO               Tak Mewlon 250 / AP600EGTO

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13 years 8 months ago #28006 by dave_lillis
Replied by dave_lillis on topic I'm just about to start.
I'm all in favour of getting binoculars, I remember many years ago when I asked similar questions and got the binoculars answer, but I felt I still wanted a telescope, not binoculars.

If you are dead set on getting a telescope, can you give us a ball park figure of how much you want to spend, that makes it much easier for people here to direct you to a particular telescope type.
BUT, do not be fooled by hubble space telescope images of Jupiter and the Andromeda galaxy, do some research on the web in terms of the view that should be expected through a scope.

I remember showing a budding club member here in Limerick a view of the orion nebula through the 12" scope and they were totally unimpressed and asked "is that it, where's all the colour??", while someone else who had a small scope for years was blown away by the view.

Dave L. on facebook , See my images in flickr
IFAS Rep. Shannonside Astronomy Club (Limerick)

Carrying around my 20" obsession is going to kill me,
but what a way to go. :)
+ 12"LX200, MK67, Meade2045, 4"refractor

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