Observations - 20/02/20

4 months 3 weeks ago #108292 by flt158
Observations - 20/02/20 was created by flt158
Hello, all.

Do you remember me saying I would not be observing anything else in Cassiopeia? Well tonight (Thursday 20th February) I placed my William Optics 158 mm F/7 apochromatic refractor in its most craziest position ever in my back garden. Mirror diagonals are fitted at all times.
You see, Cassiopeia is going behind some trees which have no leaves.
The Sun had set at 5.44 pm.

1. 20 minutes later I found Deneb (Alpha Cygni) which was quite low in the northern sky. Some minutes past when I could see this star with my own eyes. Its magnitude is +1.3.

2. I literally wandered my scope upwards. I saw 2 stars in my 70 mm apo at 11X which were in a diagonal position. They were both invisible to my eyes. The left upper one was glorious Achird (Eta Cassiopeiae). Yellow and almond brown were the colours at 40X and 112X as before. Magnitudes: 3.5 and 7.4. Separation = 13.4". PA = 326 degrees. Those colours are still irresistible.

3. The lower right hand one was Schedar. As we all know by now it is an optical double. It is a fine sight at 40X. Magnitudes: 2.4 and 9. Sep = 70.4". PA = 280 degrees.

4. Down I went to Sigma Cassiopeiae. I got a very slim black gap at 112X as per usual. Magnitudes: 5 and 7.2. Sep = 3.1". PA = 326 degrees.

5. I very much tried to find one last carbon star in Cassiopeia before the constellation takes its leave from my back garden. It would have been my 10th carbon in the W. But the star simply would not appear in my medium powered eyepieces. It is very near SAO 35603 which has a magnitude of 7.1. That star's spectral class is K5; and indeed it has a good orange hue. My carbon star has a multitude of designations. The popular ones are: EM*AS511, C* 3193, Case 687, LS Cassiopeiae and GSC 04004-01031. My Guide 9.1 DVD calls it 3UC293-223970 and its magnitude ought to be 11.2. But from here on, I will call it LS Cassiopeiae I should be able to see it at powers 112X and 167X. I was seeing stars as faint as 12.1 after all. So a none runner here for the time being. I have since discovered that LS Cassiopeiae is a lot more fainter than I was led to believe in the first place. On www.aavso.org they give it a varying magnitude of between +14.4 down to +16.9 in a period of 340 days. Therefore the information I did receive originally was all wrong anyway. I don't think I will ever observe LS Cassiopeiae. But never mind. I stay at 9 carbon stars for the time being. I will return to Cassiopeiae in August 2020. There are one or two more carbon stars waiting to be found.

6. Before I finished I did observe Almach (Gamma Andromedae). It is wonderfully split at 40X and 112X. Magnitudes: 2.3 and 5.0. Sep = 9.4". PA = 63 degrees.Who can resist its colours? Golden yellow - orange and blue!

Thank you for reading.
Comments are very welcome.

Clear skies,

Aubrey.
The following user(s) said Thank You: michael_murphy, Fermidox, Until_then-Goodnight!

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

4 months 3 weeks ago - 4 months 3 weeks ago #108294 by Until_then-Goodnight!
Replied by Until_then-Goodnight! on topic Observations - 20/02/20
Good morning Aubrey, 

What a delightful report. I'm glad to read that you are still managing to squeeze a few more session out of the Great W in the sky, even it that means if you have to contort your body in a most unusual way, or having to climb a tree : ) 

But seriously, LS Cassiopeia sounds like an intriguing star. Do you think you'll get to observe it this year? I hope you do.

I really must try to have a look at Eta Cassiopeiae next time I'm out. 

With a bit of luck that might be tonight. I'll keep an eye on the forum to see if the meetup is going ahead tonight - fingers crossed, and clear skies, 

Darren. 
The following user(s) said Thank You: flt158

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

4 months 3 weeks ago #108297 by flt158
Replied by flt158 on topic Observations - 20/02/20
Hello Darren.

I thank you very much for your many encouraging remarks regarding me sighting LS Cassiopeiae at some stage in the future.

A little over a year ago, my Guide 9.1 DVD got a magnitude wrong. That time it was a faint carbon star in Andromeda. However I did find the particular star. Its magnitude was +13.2.
But I realise full well that searching a 13.9 magnitude star is pushing it a bit far, and that's when it's at its brightest. But that is even fainter than Pluto. I now believe that www.aavso.org is correct about LS Cassiopeiae. Also I should point out that the star has not been studied since 2015 - a full 5 years ago - and that by one guy.

But I am now ready for Cancer. And I do have some carbon stars in that constellation. I will probably still be observing this section of dark sky at Cosmos 2020.

Clear skies from Aubrey.
The following user(s) said Thank You: Until_then-Goodnight!

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

4 months 3 weeks ago #108303 by Until_then-Goodnight!
Replied by Until_then-Goodnight! on topic Observations - 20/02/20
You're more than welcome Aubrey. Out of interest, what's the faintest star you could observe with your scope? And that's fascinating about how little LS Cass has been observed. 

I spent a little bit of time in Cancer last year, but that was before I started to record my observations, so they don't really count. Ursa Major is moving into a nice position for me to observe from my back garden, so I might spend some time there over the coming weeks. 

Clear skies, 

Darren. 
The following user(s) said Thank You: flt158

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

4 months 3 weeks ago #108307 by flt158
Replied by flt158 on topic Observations - 20/02/20
You will love Ursa Major, Darren.
Do give it your best shot when the skies clear.
You might consider observing Alula Australis (Xi Ursae Majoris).

That star in Andromeda must be the faintest. Its carbon designation is Case 717 and its magnitude was +13.2. It was an extremely clear and pitch black night with no Moon and no wind. I could only see the orange star by inverted vision, i.e, the star would disappear when I looked at it directly. I don't expect to see 13.5 magnitude stars any time soon.

But I am thrilled to own this scope and I don't covet amateurs who have larger scopes.
The following user(s) said Thank You: Until_then-Goodnight!

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

4 months 3 weeks ago #108308 by lunartic
Replied by lunartic on topic Observations - 20/02/20
Ursa Major is galaxy country.  Working my way through the Herschel 400 I have already observed many galaxies in Ursa Major and I still have 29 to go.  There is also the Owl Nebula and numerous double stars.
BTW, I am not a fan of galaxies.
Paul

Programming today is a race between software engineers striving to build bigger and better programs, and the universe trying to produce bigger and better idiots. So far, the universe is winning.

Rich Cook
The following user(s) said Thank You: flt158, Until_then-Goodnight!

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

4 months 2 weeks ago #108315 by Until_then-Goodnight!
Replied by Until_then-Goodnight! on topic Observations - 20/02/20

flt158 wrote: You will love Ursa Major, Darren.
Do give it your best shot when the skies clear.
You might consider observing Alula Australis (Xi Ursae Majoris).

That star in Andromeda must be the faintest. Its carbon designation is Case 717 and its magnitude was +13.2. It was an extremely clear and pitch black night with no Moon and no wind. I could only see the orange star by inverted vision, i.e, the star would disappear when I looked at it directly. I don't expect to see 13.5 magnitude stars any time soon.

But I am thrilled to own this scope and I don't covet amateurs who have larger scopes.



Hi Aubrey, 

Very many thanks for for answering those questions. 13.2 - that is low! Just goes to show what your scope can do. Having had the privilege of looking through it on a few different occasions now, it is a magnificent instrument. The colours are so rich and crisp, and that focuser... Wow! 

Clear skies, 

Darren. 
The following user(s) said Thank You: flt158

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

4 months 2 weeks ago - 4 months 2 weeks ago #108316 by Until_then-Goodnight!
Replied by Until_then-Goodnight! on topic Observations - 20/02/20

lunartic wrote: Ursa Major is galaxy country.  Working my way through the Herschel 400 I have already observed many galaxies in Ursa Major and I still have 29 to go.  There is also the Owl Nebula and numerous double stars.
BTW, I am not a fan of galaxies.
Paul


Hi Paul, 

Please pardon my ignorance here; but how many Galaxies are in Ursa Major? 

The only time I've spent in Ursa Major was trying locate M81, 82, and 101. And to my shame, I couldn't find one! 

Hopefully, this time round I'll have better success. 

Clear skies, and best of luck with the rest of this Herschel 400. 

Darren. 
The following user(s) said Thank You: flt158

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

4 months 2 weeks ago - 4 months 2 weeks ago #108317 by lunartic
Replied by lunartic on topic Observations - 20/02/20
There are more than 50 within the reach of a medium sized telescope, 46 are in the Herschel list.  I am sure there are hundreds more that require larger scopes.

Programming today is a race between software engineers striving to build bigger and better programs, and the universe trying to produce bigger and better idiots. So far, the universe is winning.

Rich Cook
The following user(s) said Thank You: flt158, Until_then-Goodnight!

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

4 months 2 weeks ago #108320 by Until_then-Goodnight!
Replied by Until_then-Goodnight! on topic Observations - 20/02/20
Hi Paul, 

Very many thanks for answering my question. I was astonished to read that there are more than 50 within reach of a medium sized scope...amazing stuff!

Clear skies, 

Darren. 
The following user(s) said Thank You: flt158

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Moderators: Neill
Time to create page: 0.151 seconds
Powered by Kunena Forum