Asteroid 2004 XP14 on Close Approach to Earth

13 years 1 month ago #30058 by Neill
Hi all,

Got the below from a BAA electronic bulletin of whom I a member:

On the nights of 3rd and 4th July 2006 Apollo asteroid 2004 XP14 will make a close approach to the Earth. The motion of this asteroid should be visible when viewed with a medium sized telescope (typically a 10in/25cm reflector).
At this magnitude it presents no problem to CCD imagers - except keeping track of the object that is!
The closest approach to the Earth will be at 4:44 UT on 3rd July. At this time the asteroid will be just 268,873 miles from the Earth - not much further than the distance to the Moon.

>From Europe the asteroid is best viewed on the night of the 3rd/4th July when it will be approximately 12th magnitude passing through the constellation of Draco. Its motion is quite rapid - around 1 arc min per minute. Finder charts are available on the ARPS website at homepage.ntlworld.com/roger.dymock/index.htm I
would strongly recommend accessing the Minor Planet Ephemeris Service at
cfa-www.harvard.edu/iau/MPEph/MPEph.html for updated orbital elements
and an ephemeris immediately before this event.

Thanks

Neill

Linda: "All in all, this is one day Mittens the kitten won't soon forget."
Morbo: "Kittens give Morbo gas."

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13 years 1 month ago #30063 by Seanie_Morris
Replied by Seanie_Morris on topic Asteroid 2004 XP14 on Close Approach to Earth
Hhmm... I know you mentioned the scopes within range... I wonder if its pass will be noticeable in a 12" Dob's field of view? 1 arcminute per minute should be noticeable alright I reckon. What do others think? What about Dave Mac, the apparent asteroid specialist here? :)

Thanks for the heads-up Neil.

Midlands Astronomy Club.
Radio Presenter (Midlands 103), Space Enthusiast, Astronomy Outreach Co-ordinator.
Former IFAS Chairperson and Secretary.

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13 years 1 month ago #30065 by michaeloconnell
Replied by michaeloconnell on topic Asteroid 2004 XP14 on Close Approach to Earth
That should be noticeable, especially if it passes any nearby stars.

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13 years 1 month ago #30080 by dave_lillis
Replied by dave_lillis on topic Asteroid 2004 XP14 on Close Approach to Earth
If its clear, that will be easily noticable, thanks for the heads up.

Dave L. on facebook , See my images in flickr
IFAS Rep. Shannonside Astronomy Club (Limerick)

Carrying around my 20" obsession is going to kill me,
but what a way to go. :)
+ 12"LX200, MK67, Meade2045, 4"refractor

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13 years 1 month ago #30258 by Seanie_Morris
Replied by Seanie_Morris on topic Asteroid 2004 XP14 on Close Approach to Earth
Anyone try to get a glimpse of the pass? Cloudy all night, despite the haze lifting since late evening.

Midlands Astronomy Club.
Radio Presenter (Midlands 103), Space Enthusiast, Astronomy Outreach Co-ordinator.
Former IFAS Chairperson and Secretary.

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13 years 1 month ago #30275 by dave_lillis
Replied by dave_lillis on topic Asteroid 2004 XP14 on Close Approach to Earth
not only was it cloudy, it was raining to. :(

Dave L. on facebook , See my images in flickr
IFAS Rep. Shannonside Astronomy Club (Limerick)

Carrying around my 20" obsession is going to kill me,
but what a way to go. :)
+ 12"LX200, MK67, Meade2045, 4"refractor

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13 years 1 month ago #30281 by Seanie_Morris
Replied by Seanie_Morris on topic Asteroid 2004 XP14 on Close Approach to Earth
Post-event article by cnn.com:

A huge asteroid whizzed by Earth early Monday, passing about 269,000 miles from the planet's surface -- slightly farther away than the moon.

More than three dozen asteroids have flown closer to Earth in the last few years, but scientists believe 2004 XP14 is among the largest.

The asteroid, discovered in 2004, is estimated to be as wide as a half-mile based on its brightness.

Late Sunday and early Monday, it was expected to be visible as a small moving dot to amateur sky watchers with good telescopes in North America and as a fainter object in Europe. Its closest approach was over the U.S. West Coast.

Scientists estimate 2004 XP14 will have 10 more close encounters with Earth over this century, none expected to pose a threat to the planet.



Seanie.

Midlands Astronomy Club.
Radio Presenter (Midlands 103), Space Enthusiast, Astronomy Outreach Co-ordinator.
Former IFAS Chairperson and Secretary.

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